SBIR-STTR Award

Status Cues, Consistency, and Leadership Behavior
Profile last edited on: 3/26/02

Program
SBIR
Agency
NSF
Total Award Amount
$35,000
Award Phase
1
Principal Investigator
Murray Webster
Activity Indicator

Company Information

W&D Associates

1211 Via Capri
Winter Park, FL 32789
   (305) 644-9275
   N/A
   N/A
Multiple Locations:   
Congressional District:   07
County:   Orange

Phase I

Phase I year
1983
Phase I Amount
$35,000
Whether obvious (such as race, sex, or military rank) or extremely subtle (as gaze or eye contact), status cues communicate information which individuals use to classify each other-to recognize, not always consciously, with whom they are dealing and in what manner they will deal with them in interaction. Status cues such as rate and quantity of speech, fluency, dialect, posture, and other behavior patterns are all indicators or markers of social statuses possessed by people. These cues set in motion the process of status generalization, through which beliefs about characteristics of individuals determine cognitive and behavioral inequalities in their interaction. Thus, certain people are treated as subordinate or superordinate through the possession or display of these cues, and in this manner some people (or groups of people) are seen as more competent, expert, or more intelligent than others. The proposers will examine how status cues operate to structure interaction, how they interact with formal status and authority, and how they can be used to modify the undesirable effects of status generalization.The potential commercial application as described by the awardee: An attempt will be made to gain a practical understanding of the effects of status cues on perceived competence and ability to influence and develop applied techniques to improve the leadership ability of military leaders and junior officers, particularly minorities and women, who now comprise over 40% of army personnel and over 30% DOD-wide. W & D Associates is an R&D firm specializing in status determinants of interpersonal processes.

Phase II

Phase II year
---
Phase II Amount
---