SBIR-STTR Award

Low cost light weight aircraft emergency recovery system
Profile last edited on: 3/11/02

Program
SBIR
Agency
NASA | GSFC
Total Award Amount
$651,611
Award Phase
2
Principal Investigator
Anthony D Kasher
Activity Indicator

Company Information

Ballistic Recovery Systems Inc (AKA:BRS AEROSPACE )

380 Airport Road
South St Paul, MN 55075
   (651) 457-7491
   info@brsparachutes.com
   www.brsparachutes.com
Multiple Locations:   
Congressional District:   02
County:   Dakota

Phase I

Phase I year
1996
Phase I Amount
$69,736
Ballistic Recovery Systems, Inc. (BRS) proposes the development of a lightweight, low cost parachute system, utilizing thin film laminates and thermo-adhesives, to be used to recover General Aviation (GA) aircraft from potentially fatal emergency situations. Aircraft parachute recovery systems, which have been available for ultralight and experimental aircraft since the early 1980s, are responsible for saving over 150 lives to date. These smaller "sport" aircraft, which are utilized primarily for recreational use, can accommodate the added weight of a parachute with minimal effect on their utility. The parachute recovery system concept is also feasible for general aviation (GA) aircraft, but with current parachute technology, it is not very practical considering the impact the system weight has on the aircraft utility and operating costs. The development of a lightweight, unobtrusive parachute recovery system will be a significant step toward improving the safety of GA travel. While aircraft recovery systems are not intended to be a substitute for proper maintenance or good operator skills, they have proven their ability to save lives when all other emergency procedures have been exhausted. Activation of a parachute recovery system could be the only emergency procedure for preventing a serious or fatal accident resulting from catastrophes such as mid-air collisions, structural failures, icing or engine-out over unlandable terrain. If general aviation is to be revitalized in the United States, safety enhancement must be a primary concern. There is a growing interest in aircraft recovery systems within the aviation community, both domestically and internationally. The FAA is generating a certification basis for recovery systems for GA aircraft. Several European aviation organizations are pursuing mandatory installation of recovery systems on all experimental aircraft for which they are available. One domestic insurance company offers up to 10% discounts on premiums for aircraft with recovery systems. These systems will be made available to all aircraft in the experimental/amateur built category, as well as FAR Part 23 certified aircraft. Systems can be designed for retrofitting to existing aircraft as well as installing on new production aircraft. BRS has been approached by several aircraft manufacturers like Cirrus Design, Star*Kraft and Zlin Aviation, requesting recovery systems for new aircraft designs.

Phase II

Phase II year
1997 (last award dollars: 1997)
Phase II Amount
$581,875
___(NOTE: Note: no official Abstract exists of this Phase II projects. Abstract is modified by idi from relevant Phase I data. The specific Phase II work statement and objectives may differ)___ Ballistic Recovery Systems, Inc. (BRS) proposes the development of a lightweight, low cost parachute system, utilizing thin film laminates and thermo-adhesives, to be used to recover General Aviation (GA) aircraft from potentially fatal emergency situations. Aircraft parachute recovery systems, which have been available for ultralight and experimental aircraft since the early 1980s, are responsible for saving over 150 lives to date. These smaller "sport" aircraft, which are utilized primarily for recreational use, can accommodate the added weight of a parachute with minimal effect on their utility. The parachute recovery system concept is also feasible for general aviation (GA) aircraft, but with current parachute technology, it is not very practical considering the impact the system weight has on the aircraft utility and operating costs. The development of a lightweight, unobtrusive parachute recovery system will be a significant step toward improving the safety of GA travel. While aircraft recovery systems are not intended to be a substitute for proper maintenance or good operator skills, they have proven their ability to save lives when all other emergency procedures have been exhausted. Activation of a parachute recovery system could be the only emergency procedure for preventing a serious or fatal accident resulting from catastrophes such as mid-air collisions, structural failures, icing or engine-out over unlandable terrain. If general aviation is to be revitalized in the United States, safety enhancement must be a primary concern. There is a growing interest in aircraft recovery systems within the aviation community, both domestically and internationally. The FAA is generating a certification basis for recovery systems for GA aircraft. Several European aviation organizations are pursuing mandatory installation of recovery systems on all experimental aircraft for which they are available. One domestic insurance company offers up to 10% discounts on premiums for aircraft with recovery systems. These systems will be made available to all aircraft in the experimental/amateur built category, as well as FAR Part 23 certified aircraft. Systems can be designed for retrofitting to existing aircraft as well as installing on new production aircraft. BRS has been approached by several aircraft manufacturers like Cirrus Design, Star*Kraft and Zlin Aviation, requesting recovery systems for new aircraft designs.