SBIR-STTR Award

Point-of-care Monitoring of the Host-Pathogen Interaction during Infection
Profile last edited on: 8/23/2021

Program
SBIR
Agency
DARPA
Total Award Amount
$999,924
Award Phase
2
Principal Investigator
Timothy E Sweeney
Activity Indicator

Company Information

Inflammatix Inc

863 Mitten Road Suite 104
Burlingame, CA 94010
   (720) 201-6689
   info@]inflammatix.com
   www.inflammatix.com
Multiple Locations:   
Congressional District:   14
County:   San Mateo

Phase I

Phase I year
2017
Phase I Amount
$1
Modern battlefield medicine has improved the rate of salvage of life and limb at the expense of a greater burden of hospitalizations for acute traumatic injuries and surgical care. The inflammation that accompanies the normal recovery from such tissue trauma is often clinically indistinguishable from early sepsis. This uncertainty can lead to delayed treatment with antibiotics and to substantially increased mortality rates. It can also lead to unnecessary treatment with antibiotics, with substantially increased morbidity, cost, and antimicrobial resistance. In several recent high-profile manuscripts, we published on the development and validation of three sets of biomarkers for sepsis that use gene expression profiling of the host immune response. For any patient with acute inflammation, these host-response gene sets can (1) determine whether an infection is present, (2) determine whether an infection is bacterial or viral, and (3) risk-stratify patients (predict 30-day mortality). This proposal aims to translate these biomarkers into one single point-of-care diagnostic for bacterial sepsis. To do this, we are partnering with a company whose device can rapidly quantitate multiple gene expression targets in multiplex with high accuracy at low cost. The final sepsis diagnostic will fill an unmet critical need in both defense and civilian applications.

Phase II

Phase II year
2017 (last award $$: 2017)
Phase II Amount
$999,923
Modern battlefield medicine has improved the rate of salvage of life and limb at the expense of a greater burden of hospitalizations for acute traumatic injuries and surgical care. The inflammation that accompanies the normal recovery from such tissue trauma is often clinically indistinguishable from early sepsis. This uncertainty can lead to delayed treatment with antibiotics and to substantially increased mortality rates. It can also lead to unnecessary treatment with antibiotics, with substantially increased morbidity, cost, and antimicrobial resistance. In several recent high-profile manuscripts, we published on the development and validation of three sets of biomarkers for sepsis that use gene expression profiling of the host immune response. For any patient with acute inflammation, these host-response gene sets can (1) determine whether an infection is present, (2) determine whether an infection is bacterial or viral, and (3) risk-stratify patients (predict 30-day mortality). This proposal aims to translate these biomarkers into one single point-of-care diagnostic for bacterial sepsis. To do this, we are partnering with a company whose device can rapidly quantitate multiple gene expression targets in multiplex with high accuracy at low cost. The final sepsis diagnostic will fill an unmet critical need in both defense and civilian applications.